Webinars

The webinars below cover a range of topics important to NCSACW’s stakeholders. Click on the links below to view the archived versions of these webinars and to access resources including slides and handouts.

These webinars cover the following topics:


Infants with Prenatal Substance Exposure

A Framework for Intervention for Infants with Prenatal Exposure and Their Families

A Framework for Intervention for Infants with Prenatal Exposure and Their FamiliesThe Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and the Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Children’s Bureau, Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, in partnership with the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare present a webinar to addresses practice and policy issues for infants with prenatal exposure and their families. The webinar introduces the Five Point Framework, which identifies points of intervention for comprehensive reform to prevent prenatal exposure and respond to the needs of pregnant women, mothers, their families and infants. The five points of intervention include pre-pregnancy, prenatal, identification at birth, post-partum, and infancy and beyond.

Presenter(s):

    • Nancy K. Young, PhD

Medication-Assisted Treatment and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Part 1: Collaborative Approaches to Treating Pregnant Women with Opioid Use Disorders

Collaborative Approaches to Treating Pregnant Women with Opioid Use DisordersThe first webinar in the series presents an overview and introduction to the newly released SAMHSA publication A Collaborative Approach to the Treatment of Pregnant Women with Opioid Use Disorders: Practice and Policy Considerations for Child Welfare, Collaborating Medical and Service Providers. The publication supports the efforts of states, tribes and local communities in addressing the needs of pregnant women with opioid use disorders, their infants and families.

Presenter(s):

    • Sharon Amatetti, MPA
    • Nancy K. Young, PhD

Date: September 19, 2016


Part 2: Partnering to Treat Pregnant Women with Opioid Disorders: Lessons Learned from a Six Site Initiative

Partnering to Treat Pregnant Women with Opioid Disorders: Lessons Learned from a Six Site InitiativeThe second webinar in the series, Partnering to Treat Pregnant Women with Opioid Use Disorders: Lessons Learned from a Six Site Initiative will provide an overview and share lessons from the SAMHSA-funded initiative, Substance Exposed Infants In-Depth Technical Assistance program. The webinar will feature key findings learned in Connecticut, Kentucky, Minnesota, New Jersey, Virginia and West Virginia.

Presenter(s):

    • Jean Blankenship, MSW
    • Linda Carpenter, MEd
    • Jill Gresham, MA
    • Kari Earle, MEd

Date: September 28, 2016

Early Identification and Treatment of Prenatally Exposed Infants

Early Identification and Treatment of Prenatally Exposed InfantsIn this webinar, attendees participated in a discussion on early identification of prenatally exposed infants at birth, definition of substance exposed infants across systems, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment of infants with NAS. Attendees for this webinar included medical partners, specifically pediatricians, neonatologists, and others in the medical community who work closely with substance exposed infants at birth. A portion of time is dedicated for Q&A with Dr. Burke and the SEI-IDTA sites. Dr. Sharon Burke, M.D. is the Clinical Director of the Infant Toddler Rehabilitation Program at PSE&G Children’s Specialized Hospital in New Brunswick, New Jersey where she joined in 1993. She is also clinical instructor in Pediatrics and Neonatology at Rutgers University Hospital and RWJMC. She did a pediatric internship and residency at NBIMC and Neonatal-Perinatal Fellowship at SPMC. From 1989-1993, Dr. Burke was the Clinical Director of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at University Hospital, Newark, NJ Dr. Burke graduated from Ross University School of Medicine in 1983. She has won several awards and honors for her work.

Presenter(s):

    • Sharon Burke, MD
    • Malia Beckwith, MD
    • David Babitsky, MBA

Date: September 3, 2013

Opioid Use in Pregnancy: A Community's Approach, The Children and Recovering Mothers (CHARM) Collaborative

Opioid Use in Pregnancy: A Community's Approach, The Children and Recovering Mothers (CHARM) CollaborativeProfessionals from the child welfare, substance abuse treatment, dependency court, and medical fields have increasingly indicated that there are a growing number of child abuse and neglect investigations and cases involving parents who abuse opioids (e.g. heroin and prescription pain medications). Further complicating the issue is a misunderstanding of the use, efficacy, and implications for child safety of medication-assisted treatment to treat opioid dependency. This webinar features the Children and Recovering Mothers (CHARM) collaborative based in Burlington, VT. CHARM is a multidisciplinary group of agencies serving pregnant women with opioid dependence, their infants and families. Discussion centers on services provided and collaborative practice elements across systems at multiple points of intervention – prenatal, birth, and postpartum.

Presenter(s):

    • Nancy K. Young, PhD
    • Sally Borden, MEd
    • Karen Shea, MSW

Date: September 23, 2014

Opioid Use, Dependency, and Treatment in Pregnancy

Opioid Use, Dependency, and Treatment in PregnancyThe Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) is pleased to present this Opioid Use Disorders and Treatment in Pregnancy webinar. The webinar will feature three national experts on the issue who will discuss how opioid use disorders are treated in pregnancy, its impact on infants and innovative strategies in working families. Hendrée Jones, PhD, Professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina (UNC), Chapel Hill and Executive Director, Horizons, co-author of the MOTHERS study. Dr. Jones will discuss the treatment of opioid use disorders during pregnancy and her work with women at UNC Horizons. Horizons is a program of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the UNC, Chapel Hill. The program provides substance abuse treatment for pregnant and parenting women and their children and works collaboratively with multiple service providers to provide a range of services. Carl Seashore, MD, Medical Director of the Newborn Nursery at UNC Chapel Hill, North Carolina Women's Hospital - Dr. Seashore will discuss the impact of prenatal exposure to opioids and share his experience in working with exposed infants in the Newborn period and with the Horizons program. Anne Johnston, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT and Medical Director, Neonatal Medical Follow-Up Program, the University of Vermont Children's Hospital, Burlington, VT. Dr. Johnston also serves as the attending neonatologist at the University of Vermont Children's Hospital where she is a member of the CHARM collaborative, a group that provides care to infants prenatally exposed to opioids and their mothers. Dr. Johnston will highlight the features and services available to families through the CHARM collaborative following hospital discharge.

Presenter(s):

    • Anne Johnston, MD
    • Hendrée E. Jones, PhD
    • Carl Seashore, MD

Date: May 13, 2015

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) Series, Part I of II: Understanding MAT for Families Affected by Substance Use Disorders

Treatment for Opioid Use DisordersThe convergence of various factors highlight the need to understand the efficacy, use and implications of medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for families receiving child welfare services. Individuals may be undergoing MAT for a variety of issues –mental health disorders, pain management and substance use. MAT for mental health issues can include use of psychotropic medications. MAT can be used to assist in pain management for both short and long-term conditions. Medical marijuana legislation further compounds the issue as individuals can be prescribed marijuana for pain management and other disorders. The advent of new medications highlight the need to understand MAT for substance use disorders.

In the first of this two-part series, presenters will provide an overview of medication-assisted treatment for various issues and explore currently available medications. Practice and policy examples addressing the use of MAT in child welfare and dependency court jurisdictions will be presented and discussed.

Presenter(s):

    • Nancy K. Young, PhD
    • Mark W. Parrino, MPA

Date: July 7, 2011


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Screening and Assessment for Family Engagement and Retention

Screening and Assessment for Family Engagement and Retention

Screening and Assessment for Family Engagement and RetentionThis webinar presents information on screening and assessment for family engagement and retention. Screening, assessment as well as communication and active collaboration across systems help ensure that parents in need of substance abuse treatment are identified and receive appropriate treatment in a timely manner. This webinar will explore strategies and issues involved at both a systems and practice level. Specifically, participants will learn about Connecticut’s Recovery Specialist Voluntary Program (RSVP). RSVP is a program for child welfare involved parents/caregivers who have had a child removed that facilitates timely access to family-centered substance use treatment. This program is a result of a joint collaboration between child welfare, the dependency courts and substance use treatment to develop an integrated system of care for substance affected families by changing policies, procedures and practices to promote inter-agency collaboration and data sharing. A panel will highlight the creative solutions that the collaborative used to sustain and expand beyond the original pilot sites by engaging key stakeholders and re-directing funding.

Presenter(s):

    • Nancy K. Young, PhD
    • Sara J. Becker, PhD
    • Linda Carpenter

Date: December 9, 2014


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Trauma

Trauma-Informed Care for Families Affected by Substance Use Disorders

Trauma-Informed Care for Families Affected by Substance Use DisordersThis webinar will explore the systems and practice level changes that can be made to provide trauma-informed care. Participants will learn about NCSACW’s Trauma-Informed Care Assessment Project, through which NCSACW and Dr. Vivian Brown conducted trauma-informed care walkthrough assessments with five partnerships across the country with Family Drug Courts that serve families affected by substance abuse and child maltreatment. These walkthrough assessments enabled the sites to better understand services through the eyes of their clients, uncovered inadvertent trauma triggers and generated concrete changes to become a more trauma-informed system. Participants of this webinar will learn key strategies they can implement at their agency to minimize trauma triggers for clients. Dr. Laurie Markoff will describe the core competencies of trauma-informed interactions and participants will hear case vignettes that highlight use of these competencies. Participants will learn key skills that helping professionals can use to better engage clients who have been affected by trauma.

Presenter(s):

    • Melissa Lujan, MA
    • Sara J. Becker, PhD
    • Dr. Vivian Brown
    • Amanda Kellerman, MSW
    • Dr. Laurie S. Markoff

Date: March 26, 2015


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Models of Collaboration

Regional Partnership Grant – Enhanced Collaboration, Promising Results

Regional Partnership Grant – Enhanced Collaboration, Promising ResultsIn this webinar, the Children’s Bureau in the Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, with the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare present findings from the Regional Partnership Grant program. On September 28, 2006, the Child and Family Services Improvement Act of 2006 (P.L. 109-288) was signed into law. The legislation was designed to improve the lives of abused and neglected children and their families, and included provisions that specifically address those children who are affected by a parent’s methamphetamine and other substance use disorders. In 2007, the Children’s Bureau awarded 53 grantees representing state, county, and tribal partnerships “Targeted Grants to Increase the Well-Being of, and to Improve the Permanency Outcomes for, Children Affected by Methamphetamine or Other Substance Abuse.” The RPG Program represents the largest data set ever collected on families with substance use disorders in or at risk of entering the child welfare system. The webinar will highlight the strategies and services that were implemented, outcomes achieved, lessons learned in implementation and evaluation, and successful sustainability strategies.

Presenter(s):

    • Ken DeCerchio, MSW, CAP
    • Chad Rodi, PhD

Date: April 16, 2014

New England Practice and Policy: Kick-off Webinar

New England Practice and Policy: Kick-off WebinarThis kick-off webinar provides an overview of the issues facing child welfare, substance abuse treatment providers and the courts in the New England region, presents current models of reform, integrates identified priority areas, and discusses common barriers and contextual issues for New England.

Presenter(s):

    • Nancy K. Young, PhD
    • Sara J. Becker, PhD
    • Sharon Amatetti, M.P.H

Date: September 30, 2014


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Evidence Based Practices for Families Affected by Substance Use Disorders

The Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery

The Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and RecoveryThis webinar discusses practical issues around the implementation of the Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery. The Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery curriculum was first published in 1995 and was adapted from the Nurturing Program for Parents and Children Birth to 5 Years to address the specific needs of families affected by parental substance abuse. The curriculum focuses on the effects of substance abuse on families, parenting, and the parent-child relationship.

The webinar features Terri Bogage, MSW, LICSW, the Director of Family and Children’s Services and Dianna Christmas, MPH, Parent-Child Services Coordinator at the Institute for Health and Recovery (IHR). The webinar will discuss: implementation considerations and challenges; issues related to adaptation of the model; implementation drivers and challenges; and fidelity monitoring.

Presenter(s):

    • Dianna Christmas, MPH
    • Terri Bogage, MSW, LICSW Institute for Health and Recovery
    • Ken DeCerchio, MSW, CAP
    • Marianna Corona, MSW

Date: August 6, 2014

Practical Issues in the Implementation of the Matrix Model

Practical Issues in the Implementation of the Matrix ModelThis webinar discusses practical issues around the implementation of the Matrix Model. The Matrix Model is an intensive outpatient treatment approach for stimulant abuse and dependence that was developed through 20 years of experience in real-world treatment settings. The intervention consists of relapse-prevention groups, education groups, social-support groups, individual counseling, and urine and breath testing delivered over a 16-week period. The program includes education for family members affected by the addiction. The webinar features Jeanne L. Obert, LMFT, MSM. Ms. Obert is a founder, past Executive Director and present Chairperson of the Board of Matrix Institute, a nonprofit corporation that delivers outpatient treatment and mental health services in the Los Angeles, CA area. Matrix is affiliated with the UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and is a site for the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN). Recently she worked with others to create the soon-to-be-released second edition of the Hazelden Matrix materials and a Matrix manual for persons involved in the criminal justice system. She has worked to create a system designed to disseminate the Model with fidelity nationally and internationally. The webinar will discuss: implementation considerations and challenges; issues related to adaptation of the model; implementation drivers and challenges; fidelity monitoring, and measurement of impact and outcomes.

Presenter(s):

    • Jeanne Obert, LMFT, MSM
    • Andrea Weiner
    • Ken DeCerchio
    • Elaine Stedt, MSW

Date: October 22, 2014

Developing a Coordinated Response to Families Affected by Substance Use Disorders

Developing a Coordinated Response to Families Affected by Substance Use DisordersResearch and practical experience has long demonstrated the prevalence of parental substance use disorders (SUD) among families in the child welfare system. Historically, a lack of coordination and collaboration has hindered the ability of multiple service providers in supporting families impacted SUDs. As child welfare involved families have complex needs, a coordinated effort between systems is needed. Most recently, the increasing number of jurisdictions that are working to develop a response to families affected by opioid use has cast a renewed interest on the issue. The Children’s Bureau staff has partnered with the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare (NCSACW) to facilitate a webinar for Children’s Justice Act (CJA) grantees addressing collaborative practice at the "front-end" of child welfare practice (e.g. intake and investigation). The presenters will share lessons learned from collaborative site examples. Participants will also learn about resources available through NCSACW and how to access technical assistance.

Presenter(s):

    • Hanh Dao, MSW

Date: May 6, 2015


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