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Infants with Prenatal Substance Exposure

pregnancyEach year, an estimated 15 percent of infants are affected by prenatal alcohol or illicit drug exposure. Prenatal exposure to alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs has the potential to cause a wide spectrum of physical and developmental challenges for these infants. There is also potential for ongoing challenges in the stability and well-being of infants who have been prenatally exposed, and their families if substance use disorders are not addressed with appropriate treatment and long-term recovery support. The intersection of pregnancy and substance use creates a need for a collaborative approach among medical, substance use, child welfare, and early childhood providers to address the multifaceted needs of the mother, infant, and family. Coordinated services and early intervention for pregnant women with substance use disorders and their infants are critical in preparing families for optimal bonding, health, and well-being.

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    • Collaboration Pathways for Infants and Families Affected by Substance Use Disorders: Lessons From New Jersey
      Collaboration Pathways for Infants and Families Affected by Substance Use Disorders: Lessons From New Jersey(PDF 496 KB)

      National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare, 2019

      This case study highlights New Jersey’s progress and achievements related to their engagement with the National Center on Substance Abuse and Child Welfare In-Depth Technical Assistance (IDTA) Program. The report describes the context of New Jersey’s IDTA engagements, the accomplishments achieved, the barriers encountered, and guidance and lessons for practice and policy reform for states to consider to improve outcomes for infants and families affected by prenatal substance exposure.

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